Traveling to Ushuaia – A Journey To The End Of The World

4 a.m. around 100 km north of Río Gallegos. I haven’t slept for 32 hours, but the vast Patagonian landscape of veldt you are traveling through fills you with excitement and numbness at the same time, that makes it impossible to find rest. The hours pass, you stare out of the window and it’s as if you would glance at a prehistoric, untouched landscape and realizes how our planet might have been looked a million years ago, before mankind started to cover the earth with highways, urban sprawling and industrial sites.

I could have taken a plane. I could have avoided effort and pain. I could have saved time and money. I could have chosen the nice and easy way. But ever since I have seen the unfamiliar name of Ushuaia, the most southern town in the world, on a map I knew that traveling over land to this destination on tip of the American Continent would be the only way for me. The journey is the reward.

On the bus I met Ricardo, a student from Puerto Montt/ Chile. Together we have been listening to Gustavo Santaolalla’s great song “De Ushuaia a la Quiaca” over and over again, and it seems as if the Argentinean composer has created the perfect soundtrack for traveling trough Patagonia: a hypnotizing melody of distant, superjacent guitars containing this piercing twitch of solitude. A music that intensifies the delirious state on the edge of being awake and falling asleep I’ve been for almost 2 days. As further we are traveling south I realize that we are approaching to the end of the world, to a point were you can’t go any further.

The landscape changes, it’s getting sparser. Sometimes from the middle of nowhere turns up a sheep farm or some remote village consisting of three wooden houses and a church, but as soon as we have passed, there’s pampas, solitude and loneliness again. The incredible vast sky is melting with the horizon and suddenly you wonder if you will ever reach your destination or if this fragile dream of rough beauty might continue forever. And maybe it doesn’t matter anymore, because you have already crossed a hidden frontier and reached an inner point of no return.

But suddenly it all ends, Magellan Strait, the last barrier that had separated us from legendary Tierra del Fuego, has been crossed and we actually reach Ushuaia. The bus spills out its tired, exhausted and happy freight and it feels like a rebirth, like an awakening. Windy roads lead me to the port where giant cruise ships and rotten fishing boats are swaying in Beagle Channel. I’m glancing at the nearby mountain range, forming part of the National Park Tierra del Fuego, when a sudden thought rises up: maybe this isn’t the end of the world; maybe it’s just the beginning.

Boho Is Back, Conscious, Holistic Fashion!

Funky and chill, free spirited Bohemian fashion, conscious design that is holistic and now more necessary than ever. Patchwork gypsy skirts and hippy yoga pants, embroidered caftans, colorful tribal, paisley prints and chunky bead jewelry are totally in style. With a resurgence of design styles and fashion icons ramping up its popularity, bohemian hippy chic fashion is known for its earthy wanderlust roots and relaxed vibe.

Travelers of the old world “Banjara” were gypsy wanderers, who wanted to be different and lived life on their choice set of rules, creating trends and not following a social dictum.The boho lifestyle and clothing is based on the diverse gamut of cultures and patterns with the archetype of mixing and layering clothes, prints and colors. Earthy conscious designs, upcycled vintage fabrics, traditional handloom prints and weaves, the choices are endless. Mix and match Indian chikankari tunics with cutout ragged jeans! Georgette tunic dresses as beach cover ups, or use the white shift dresses for yoga and meditation, adding on accessories like the earthing malabeads and copper bracelets, seeking nature and connecting to mother earth.

The boho style sees Priyanka Chopra donning a cute cutout midi dress in tie dye at the country festivals, the Boho vibe is casually chic and elegant. Mylie Cyrus wears the colorful bohemian sari mini skirt with a white blouse tucked in at the waist.
The newer side of this trend has moved onto a “hippie-luxury” style with fashion designers creating earthing luxury style collections overflowing with old style fabrics full of passion and tranquil colors. The dreamy bohemian fashionista plays with long maxi skirts, soft flirty tunic caftans, embroidered dresses and earthy stonewashed fabrics.

The ultra modern Bohemian grounds herself to Mother Earth, rejoicing in her love and radiates confidence through her choice of earthy colors. The style manifests in the romance of original tribal art with pure cotton and ethical fabrics. Upcycled saris made into skirts and dresses, the fun and playful look is easy to accessorize and you create a fashion statement like no other as these are so unique and one of a kind.

Street style bohemian can be funky or chic, the gauzy printed maxidress is good for all seasons. Sandals and a hat for the summer or add a light jacket and booties for cooler days. The authentic tribal patchwork design skirts and boho vintage pants contrasts with the bold black tank, mixing bohemian with city chic. Be a glamorous fashionista, create your own style – conscious, holistic, earth friendly and in tune with nature, using clothing artisan created and unique.
Be a Boldly Mogul Bohemian Fashionista!

Safer Cars Does Not Mean Safer Roads

These days, it is pretty standard for cars to include top of the line safety features. These range from rear-view cameras, lane departure warnings, traction control and even blind spot detection.

Driving a safe vehicle can also mean more money in your pocket as drivers can save on car insurance cost. A car insurance company is generally able to provide more affordable car insurance if your vehicle has safety features. However, safer cars do not necessarily mean safer roads across the country.

From January to June, approximately 18,720 people have died on U.S. roads. As a result of a growing economy, people are driving more miles compared to recession level data. Less unemployment means more cars are on the road getting people to and from work and more money for leisure activities. In 2017, Americans traveled 3.22 trillion miles according to the Federal Highway Administration.

Factor in more miles driven along with speeding, drug and alcohol impaired driving and distracted driving and the fatality rate is at an all-time high.

South Carolina leads the nation in traffic fatality rates per miles traveled. In 2017, the state had 1.88 deaths per 100 million miles traveled, which is almost two times the national average. Illinois reported 1,090 traffic deaths.

This trend prompted Governor Rauner to declare August 17 as Traffic Fatality Awareness Day at the Illinois State Fair through a partnership with the Illinois Department of Transportation, the Illinois State Police, Illinois Department of Health, Illinois Secretary of State and Mothers Against Drunk Driving.

States across the country have launched similar awareness efforts like Vision Zero. Vision Zero’s goal is to strategically eliminate traffic fatalities and injuries while increasing safe, healthy and equitable mobility for everyone.

Reducing speed is perhaps the most effective way to reduce the fatalities. Speed increases the distance it takes a car to come to a complete stop. The speed of impact is also directly correlated to the risk of death. The higher the speed of impact, the higher the probability of a passenger dying becomes.

Even with lower speeds, it is hard for police officers to enforce these lower limits. Automated cameras are already unpopular and adding more would also be costly.